Array functions in Adobe Workfront Fusion

Access requirements

You must have the following access to use the functionality in this article:

Adobe Workfront plan*

Pro or higher

Adobe Workfront license*

Plan, Work

Adobe Workfront Fusion license**

Workfront Fusion for Work Automation and Integration

Product Your organization must purchase Adobe Workfront Fusion as well as Adobe Workfront to use functionality described in this article.

*To find out what plan, license type, or access you have, contact your Workfront administrator.

**For information on Adobe Workfront Fusion licenses, see Adobe Workfront Fusion licenses

add (array; value1; value2; …)

Adds values specified in parameters to an array and returns that array.

contains (array; value)

Verifies if an array contains the value.

distinct (array; [key])

Removes duplicates inside an array. Use the “key” argument to access properties inside complex objects. To access nested properties, use dot notation. The first item in an array is index 1.

INFO

Example: distinct(Contacts[];name)

Removes duplicates inside an array of contacts by comparing the “name” property

flatten (array)

Creates a new array with all sub-array elements concatenated into it, recursively, up to the specified depth.

join (array; separator)

Concatenates all of the items of an array into a string, using the specified separator between each item.

keys (object)

Returns an array of the properties of a given object or array.

length (array)

Returns the number of items in an array.

map (complex array; key;[key for filtering];[possible values for filtering])

Returns a primitive array containing values of a complex array. This function allows filtering values. Use raw variable names for keys.

INFO

Examples:

  • map(Emails[];email)

    Returns a primitive array with emails

  • map(Emails[];email;label;work;home)

    Returns a primitive array with emails having a label equal to work or home

For more information, see Map information from one module to another in Adobe Workfront Fusion

merge (array1; array2; …)

Merges one or more arrays into one array.

remove (array; value1; value2; …)

Removes values specified in the parameters of an array. This function is effective only on primitive arrays of text or numbers.

reverse (array)

The first element of the array becomes the last element, the second becomes the next-to-last, and so on.

slice (array; start; [end])

Returns a new array containing only selected items.

sort (array; [order]; [key])

Sorts values of an array. The valid values of the order parameter are:

  • asc

    (default) - ascending order: 1, 2, 3, … for type Number. A, B, C, a, b, c, … for type Text

  • desc

    descending order: …, 3, 2, 1 for type Number. …, c, b, a, C, B, A for type Text.

  • asc ci

    case insensitive ascending order: A, a, B, b, C, c, … for type Text.

  • desc ci

    case insensitive descending order: …, C, c, B, b, A, a for type Text.

Use the key parameter to access properties inside complex objects.

Use raw variable names for keys.

To access nested properties, use dot notation.

The first item in an array is index 1.

INFO

Examples:

  • sort(Contacts[];name)

    Sorts an array of contacts by the “name” property in default ascending order

  • sort(Contacts[];desc;name)

    Sorts an array of contacts by the “name” property in descending order

  • sort(Contacts[];asc ci;name)

    Sorts an array of contacts by the “name” property in case-insensitive ascending order

  • sort(Emails[];sender.name)

    Sorts an array of emails by the “sender.name” property

arrayDifference [array1, array2, mode]

Returns the difference between two arrays.

Enter one of the following values for the mode parameter.

  • classic: Returns a new array that contains all elements of array1 that do not exist in array2.

  • symmetric: Returns an array of elements that are not common to both arrays.

    In other words, the function returns an array that contains all of the elements of array1 that do not exist in array2, and all of the elements of array2 that do not exist in array1.

    INFO

    Examples:

    Given the following arrays:

    myArray = [1,2,3,4,5]
    
    yourArray = [3,4,5,6,7]
    
    • arrayDifference [myArray, yourArray, classic]

      Returns [1,2]

    • arrayDifference [yourArray, myArray, classic]

      Returns [6,7]

    • arrayDifference [myArray, yourArray, symmetric]

      Returns [1,2,6,7]

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