Common routing patterns

Last update: 2024-02-12
  • Created for:
  • Beginner
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In this video, you will learn:

  • The difference mutually exclusive and non-exclusive router paths.
 Transcript

Now that we understand how to use routers in our scenarios, let’s take a look at some common routing patterns and the difference between mutually exclusive and non-exclusive router paths. In this fictitious example, let’s take a look at what happens when we send a red dot through the scenario. There’s a filter on the first path asking is that dot red. If so, continue on. The second path has no filter, so all bundles or all colors of information will pass through. For the red dot, if we send it through the scenario, it will pass down both paths. However, the green dot will be blocked by the filter on the first path, but then go down the second.

If we expand upon this scenario and add a third path, what will happen when we send down a red dot, a green dot or a dot that is both red and green? For the red dot, it’s going to go down the top and the bottom paths. The green dot will go down the middle and the bottom path and the dot that is both colors will go down all three paths because it is red, it is green and the third path has no filter. When bundles of information can only go down one path based off of the filtering criteria established, we call this a mutually exclusive choice or path. In the example at the left, if a red dot is passed through the scenario it will only go down the top path because it is red. If a green dot is passed through the scenario, it will only go down the middle path because it is green. If you send down a yellow dot or any other color, it will only go down that third path, some other color.

A non-exclusive choice or path means a bundle of information can be passed down one or multiple paths because it will meet certain criteria in the filters. In this example, we’re now switching to numbers where we can pass numbers through this scenario and if it’s less than a 100, it will go down the first path. If it’s less than 1000, it’ll go down the second. If it’s less than 10,000, it will go down the third. If we pass the number 75 through the scenario, it will satisfy both the first, second and third filter paths. If we send the number 750 through this scenario, it will be stopped by the first path filter but then satisfy the second and the third. If we send 7,500 through this scenario, it will be blocked by the first and second path filters but make it through the third. Finally, if we send 75,000 through the scenario, it will not meet any of the filtering criteria and therefore stop at the router. -

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